Tech Figure In Dot-Com Child Sex Scandal Was A Clinton Global Initiative Member

Brock Pierce is a controversial figure who has received surprisingly little attention despite connections to the Clinton Foundation, digital currency Bitcoin and involvement in a notorious scandal involving a child abuse ring.

Brock was a member of the Clinton Global Initiative, former child actor who appeared in films such as the 1992 classic Mighty Ducks and Disney’s “First Kid,” and Chairman of the Board at the Bitcoin Foundation. Pierce also co-founded the Digital Entertainment Network (DEN), a forerunner of video sharing site Youtube.

DEN was founded in 1996 amid the rapid growth of the dot-com bubble. It raised $72 million in investment before even opening in 1999, a massive amount of capital considering that, at least on the surface, DEN was not yet providing investors with anything in return. At the time news sources scoffed at the massive salaries top executives were paid when the company was not even creating revenue. An SEC filing obtained by Hollywood periodical Radar Online reveals that DEN’s investors included a shocking number of big name personalities such as media executives Garth Ancier and David Geffen, former Yahoo CEO Terry Semel, film producers Gary Goddard and Bryan Singer, Wall Street czar Mitchell Blutt, A&M Records head Gilbert Friesen (now deceased), former Disney executive David Neuman, manager and label executive Gary Gersh, investor Jeffrey Sachs, former Congressman Michael Huffington, actors Ben and Fred Savage, and tech companies such as Microsoft and Dell. The lack of apparent revenue raises questions about what investors in DEN were expecting in return.

In 2000, DEN suffered an absolute disaster amid claims by employees and several Hollywood child actors such as Michael Egan III that Pierce and his partners, Chad Shackley and Marc Collins-Rector ran a child abuse ring with a number of other Hollywood directors and A-list actors, many of whom were financially tied to DEN. Egan alleged that between the ages of 15 to 17, he would be given alcohol, cocaine and other drugs and was raped repeatedly along with other young boys who were present. The abuse allegedly occurred at the house shared by Collins-Rector, Shackley and Pierce as well as on trips to Hawaii. On at least one occasion, Collins-Rector threatened Egan with a gun to force him into compliance. Egan filed a civil suit after his reports to the LAPD and FBI fell on deaf ears. Individuals named in the suit included Pierce, Collins-Rector, Shackley, as well as Bryan Singer, Garth Ancier, Gary Goddard and David Neuman.

Mr. Egan’s allegations mirror other similar claims made by actors such as Corey Feldman and Elijah Wood that child sex abuse is rampant in Hollywood.

Pierce and his co-accused resigned from DEN and fled hurriedly to Spain to escape the FBI. Collins Rector was apparently primarily concerned that investor David Geffen wished to kill him over the scandal. Depositions taken from Pierce revealed that Geffen had purportedly been paying an employee to spy on DEN, and that he had been fed information and stolen faxes.

Ultimately, Collins-Rector was the only individual charged with sex offenses in relation to the scandal. Brock Pierce was never able fully escape negative public opinion over the role he played however. When he became the Chairman of the Board at the Bitcoin Foundation, at least 10 members resigned in protest. Several resignation letters explicitly listed Pierce’s association with pedophilia and child pornography as the reason for their departure.

Pierce is one of several public figures dogged by allegations of child sex abuse with financial or social ties to the Clinton Foundation.

2 thoughts on “Tech Figure In Dot-Com Child Sex Scandal Was A Clinton Global Initiative Member”

  1. It’s worth noting that there is a full documentary on Pierce and his cohorts available for free on YouTube.
    It’s a daunting watch that fully portrays the gravity of the situation.
    Great work, EV.

Comment